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Revit Arch and understanding Assemblies

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Henrik Gade
Active Member

Greetings fellow BimScapers!

I'm having a challenge (which I need to overcome) working with assemblies. More specifically making detail drawings on stuff like how windows and doors are mounted. The cross section where roof and wall meet eachother. Drawing the support for a floating floor ect.

I know the technical part to some extend of creating these things, but I am wondering, how do you all practice making these drawings? (If you make them at all, I know not all architectual designers need to work with it)

Having little real life construction experience, I am mainly using "standard drawings" from the producents of the products I use. But I don't really feel like i'm learning anything, other than how to trace a drawing! 

So anyone got some good recommendations for how to approach this phase in the revit ?

Quote
Topic starter Posted : 07/04/2021 11:58 am
BIMscape
Member Admin
Posted by: @nikmi

Greetings fellow BimScapers!

I'm having a challenge (which I need to overcome) working with assemblies. More specifically making detail drawings on stuff like how windows and doors are mounted. The cross section where roof and wall meet eachother. Drawing the support for a floating floor ect.

I know the technical part to some extend of creating these things, but I am wondering, how do you all practice making these drawings? (If you make them at all, I know not all architectual designers need to work with it)

Having little real life construction experience, I am mainly using "standard drawings" from the producents of the products I use. But I don't really feel like i'm learning anything, other than how to trace a drawing! 

So anyone got some good recommendations for how to approach this phase in the revit ?

Hi Henrik,

Many thanks for starting this topic- seems like this is a really interesting question.

Just to be clear: Do you mean, how do people get the experience to know how the various building details go together? Or is it more a specific Revit question- as to how some of these details are best created in Revit?

Many thanks,

Kind regards,

Ian

ReplyQuote
Posted : 08/04/2021 11:05 am
Henrik Gade
Active Member

@iannichols_sxa5jqu0 Both 🙂 thats the quick answer!

ReplyQuote
Topic starter Posted : 08/04/2021 11:23 am
BIMscape
Member Admin
Posted by: @nikmi

@iannichols_sxa5jqu0 Both 🙂 thats the quick answer!

Ah, OK!

Well in terms of Revit, I do think there is a tendency for some people to put to much geometry into their models- especially when you are down at the level of the fine detail. A large part of the problem is that the software is fun! So it can be very compelling to put 'every last nut and bolt' into the model- maybe show that off to your peers, boss, etc. Yes, it may look visually impressive- and it may show off the Revit skills you have. BUT: We must never forget to ask: WHY are we producing this information? Who is it for? HOW MUCH information do they need- or NOT, as the case may be.

So it terms of details: Quite often, 2D details are absolutely fine and will convey the information required. Keep it simple UNLESS it needs to be more complicated.

I hope this kicks off what could be a very interesting discussion!

Many thanks,

Kind regards,

Ian

ReplyQuote
Posted : 08/04/2021 11:47 am
Henrik Gade
Active Member
Posted by: @iannichols_sxa5jqu0
Posted by: @nikmi

@iannichols_sxa5jqu0 Both 🙂 thats the quick answer!

Ah, OK!

Well in terms of Revit, I do think there is a tendency for some people to put to much geometry into their models- especially when you are down at the level of the fine detail. A large part of the problem is that the software is fun! So it can be very compelling to put 'every last nut and bolt' into the model- maybe show that off to your peers, boss, etc. Yes, it may look visually impressive- and it may show off the Revit skills you have. BUT: We must never forget to ask: WHY are we producing this information? Who is it for? HOW MUCH information do they need- or NOT, as the case may be.

So it terms of details: Quite often, 2D details are absolutely fine and will convey the information required. Keep it simple UNLESS it needs to be more complicated.

I hope this kicks off what could be a very interesting discussion!

Many thanks,

Kind regards,

Ian

Thats some VERY good insight! - In my coming trade, we are expected to make those drawings at times, where you can find every nut and bold. But as you say it's also about considering your client. No reason to create a detailed 2D view with 100 details to the project owner, who know nothing about the construction progress and just wants to move into the house when its done.

Do you use any specific sources, when in doubt about how to solve an issue when it comes to detailing? or are you just a hardcore "tradesman" by now, that knows it by heart?

ReplyQuote
Topic starter Posted : 08/04/2021 11:58 am
BIMscape
Member Admin

@nikmi Well, I am an Architect, so I was involved more with the conceptual design rather than the detailed design. I worked with a number of really good Architectural Technologists who had years of experience of how buildings go together. They would resolve all the details.

Also, for certain products- the manufacturers sometime have detailed "CAD blocks" you can download and then insert into your model, over the top of sections, callouts, etc.

And of course, there are many great books which take you through the principles of construction, explaining all the details.

When all is said and done: You cannot / should not rely on Revit for the detail- because it won't create that- you have to!

Many thanks,

Kind regards,

Ian

ReplyQuote
Posted : 08/04/2021 12:04 pm
Bill Manders
New Member

I am an Architectural Technologist. I did construction detailing at college many many years ago. At that time everything was drawn out by hand on a drawing board. I still believe that this is probably the best way to learn how things go together- by drawing them out. Showing my age now!

ReplyQuote
Posted : 08/04/2021 9:09 pm
BIMscape
Member Admin
Posted by: @revit150

I am an Architectural Technologist. I did construction detailing at college many many years ago. At that time everything was drawn out by hand on a drawing board. I still believe that this is probably the best way to learn how things go together- by drawing them out. Showing my age now!

I also started on a drawing board and used one all the way through University. That was back in the days of AutoCAD 12 (I think!) and 3D Studio 2. Showing my age too!

Kind regards,

Ian

ReplyQuote
Posted : 08/04/2021 9:17 pm
Stuart Allerton
Active Member
Posted by: @nikmi

Greetings fellow BimScapers!

I'm having a challenge (which I need to overcome) working with assemblies. More specifically making detail drawings on stuff like how windows and doors are mounted. The cross section where roof and wall meet eachother. Drawing the support for a floating floor ect.

I know the technical part to some extend of creating these things, but I am wondering, how do you all practice making these drawings? (If you make them at all, I know not all architectual designers need to work with it)

Having little real life construction experience, I am mainly using "standard drawings" from the producents of the products I use. But I don't really feel like i'm learning anything, other than how to trace a drawing! 

So anyone got some good recommendations for how to approach this phase in the revit ?

Not sure if you work in an office? Or at college? Do you have someone who can mentor you?

ReplyQuote
Posted : 09/04/2021 9:43 am
Henrik Gade
Active Member

@cadx I'm doing a bachelors in architecture and management 🙂 - Sure we got teachers! - But they dwell deep into anything. Also trying to bring some discussion topics to this new forum, to get it going.. Sending a mail to my teacher, won't facilitate that 😉 

ReplyQuote
Topic starter Posted : 09/04/2021 9:48 am
Stuart Allerton
Active Member

@nikmi ah, OK. I'm guessing on that course construction detailing will not be covered in any real depth? In my experience people only really learn how buildings go together when they get onto real jobs in practice. Just make sure (at the interview stage) that your employer is going to make sure you get good, all round experience- not just stuck in a corner doing mundane tasks.

ReplyQuote
Posted : 09/04/2021 10:01 am
Henrik Gade
Active Member
Posted by: @cadx

@nikmi ah, OK. I'm guessing on that course construction detailing will not be covered in any real depth? In my experience people only really learn how buildings go together when they get onto real jobs in practice. Just make sure (at the interview stage) that your employer is going to make sure you get good, all round experience- not just stuck in a corner doing mundane tasks.

Thats some good insight. I am hoping to pick up some knowledge before that though.. Normally our school facilitate visits to constructionsites with chances to shadow and talk with craftsmen, but @corona. after creating this topic though, I've gone to youtube, and there are a fair few craftsmen type youtube channels that talk about construction methods! even if its mainly american methods (which are rather different in some aspects from how its done here in Scandinavia)

ReplyQuote
Topic starter Posted : 09/04/2021 12:05 pm
Henrik Gade
Active Member

@revit150 I totally believe there is some truth to that. I'm in my thirties myself so a bit to young to ever having worked without computers. But I do have all the essential tools of the architect trade, when it comes to drawing. - You just learn in another way when you have something on a piece of paper infront of you, instead of a computer monitor 🙂

ReplyQuote
Topic starter Posted : 09/04/2021 12:07 pm
Stuart Allerton
Active Member
Posted by: @nikmi
Posted by: @cadx

@nikmi ah, OK. I'm guessing on that course construction detailing will not be covered in any real depth? In my experience people only really learn how buildings go together when they get onto real jobs in practice. Just make sure (at the interview stage) that your employer is going to make sure you get good, all round experience- not just stuck in a corner doing mundane tasks.

Thats some good insight. I am hoping to pick up some knowledge before that though.. Normally our school facilitate visits to constructionsites with chances to shadow and talk with craftsmen, but @corona. after creating this topic though, I've gone to youtube, and there are a fair few craftsmen type youtube channels that talk about construction methods! even if its mainly american methods (which are rather different in some aspects from how its done here in Scandinavia)

Never thought of looking on YouTube for construction details! Is there anything that cannot be learnt from there?!

What are the main differences you've found so far between US and Scandinavian construction methods?

ReplyQuote
Posted : 09/04/2021 12:44 pm
Stuart Allerton
Active Member
Posted by: @nikmi
Posted by: @cadx

@nikmi ah, OK. I'm guessing on that course construction detailing will not be covered in any real depth? In my experience people only really learn how buildings go together when they get onto real jobs in practice. Just make sure (at the interview stage) that your employer is going to make sure you get good, all round experience- not just stuck in a corner doing mundane tasks.

Thats some good insight. I am hoping to pick up some knowledge before that though.. Normally our school facilitate visits to constructionsites with chances to shadow and talk with craftsmen, but @corona. after creating this topic though, I've gone to youtube, and there are a fair few craftsmen type youtube channels that talk about construction methods! even if its mainly american methods (which are rather different in some aspects from how its done here in Scandinavia)

Never thought of looking on YouTube for construction details! Is there anything that cannot be learnt from there?!

What are the main differences you've found so far between US and Scandinavian construction methods?

ReplyQuote
Posted : 09/04/2021 12:44 pm
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