AUS Basic Wall types and naming convention  

Brent
Trusted Member

RE: Module 5- Unit 2- Naming your new Wall Types

Here's more info about the differences between UK and AUS Revit.

SEE SCREENSHOT >>

You'll notice the AUS naming convention is basic terms rather than descriptive.

I'll follow Revit's AUS naming convention for now, until I get to work with professional Reviteers in Arch/Bldg/Constr. practices in the near future.

• In the screenshot, there is no Concrete Masonry Unit (or concrete block/work as our common usage term). It's not the Generic 100/200/300mm Wall, which displays plain; no hatching.
• Studs steel/timber; no hatching.
• Concrete precast or tiltup; neither provided. But common as hen's teeth in our construction residential, commercial, industrial.
• A range of standard Green Building types with insulation layer etc? Nope.

Looks like I'll be getting a lot more WALL drawing practice out in drafting office than I first imagined!

[attachment file=10219]

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Posted : 23/01/2017 10:06 am
Brent
Trusted Member

ADDENDUM: Complete Wall list in Revit AUS template
-
BASIC WALL
30mm Toilet partition
Block veneer - 230 steel
Brick - 110
Brick - 230
Brick veneer - 250 steel
Brick veneer - 250 timber
Double brick - 270
Generic 100mm wall
Generic 200mm wall
Generic 300mm wall
Stud steel - 70
Stud steel - 90
Stud timber - 70
Stud timber - 90
-
CURTAIN WALL
Curtain Wall 6mm Thk Glazing
Storefront
-
STACKED WALL
250mm Brick Timber Stud, 90mm Timber Stud

Ian, would you agree that I should adopt a better naming convention, like yours? Do you foresee problems if I stick to AUS Revit's above? After all, it's easy for me to rename 14 wall types and build from there.

FUTURE SCENARIO: I've identified a few basic Australian ones above that I can build up and name as a starting point. If I get work in an A/B/C office where they're moving across to Revit from Autocad, I'd probably be the instigator of the new system. Big responsibility, big decisions. Would want to get it right first time.

Your thoughts, mate?

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Posted : 23/01/2017 2:11 pm
Ian
 Ian
Reputable Member Admin

[quote quote=10221]ADDENDUM: Complete Wall list in Revit AUS template

BASIC WALL
30mm Toilet partition
Block veneer – 230 steel
Brick – 110
Brick – 230
Brick veneer – 250 steel
Brick veneer – 250 timber
Double brick – 270
Generic 100mm wall
Generic 200mm wall
Generic 300mm wall
Stud steel – 70
Stud steel – 90
Stud timber – 70
Stud timber – 90

CURTAIN WALL
Curtain Wall 6mm Thk Glazing
Storefront

STACKED WALL
250mm Brick Timber Stud, 90mm Timber Stud

Ian, would you agree that I should adopt a better naming convention, like yours? Do you foresee problems if I stick to AUS Revit’s above? After all, it’s easy for me to rename 14 wall types and build from there.

FUTURE SCENARIO: I’ve identified a few basic Australian ones above that I can build up and name as a starting point. If I get work in an A/B/C office where they’re moving across to Revit from Autocad, I’d probably be the instigator of the new system. Big responsibility, big decisions. Would want to get it right first time.

Your thoughts, mate?

[/quote]

In The UK, Autodesk have always named their walls in the manner shown in the videos- it's been like this forever and a day- so it's all I'm used to and it makes sense to me.

I suppose the question is- If AUS users of Revit have (similarly) got used to the default Aus template- is adopting a foreign (ie UK) naming convention going to be counter-intuitive to them.

ie as you're learning Revit from scratch now- you have the luxury of picking conventions, protocols, etc- that you'd like to work with. However, you then go into an established office- and they may (more than likely) have their own ideas!

Same in the UK. A lot of office here will have their own naming protocols- especially when you move onto all the other families apart from walls!

Sorry there's no definitive answer- I suppose that's what we're all (theoretically) moving towards with BIM- is a global standardisation- think how may errors this would reduce!

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Posted : 24/01/2017 11:51 am
Brent
Trusted Member

I grew up on DOS, just prior to Windows 3.1 GUI. AutoCad was white lines on black screen. Filenames were maximum 8 letters PLUS 3 for the file type extension. For me, that created a habit of maximising filenames using abbreviations that had some relevance down the track – when memory and time had dulled the meaning.

I've carried that habit across to the Massive Filename Capability of present-day Windows. A glance at a bulk of document and/or library component files in Explorer helps me know what they're about WITHOUT having to open them (usually) in their associated program.

So, I know your UK Revit system is eminently practical and I think for now, I'll work up a version of that for my AUS Revitting.

When I pickup some contract or in-office drafting work over the coming months, I'll do a merge with their office standards. Probably at TAFE College next month, the lecturers will be able to clarify why AUS differs from UK. If there are slightly different priorities in building design and construction due to local Australian factors, I'll find out pretty quickly, for sure.

Thanks for your experienced, insightful comments on this tricky one, Ian. Cheers.

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Posted : 25/01/2017 3:25 am
peter
Active Member

Hi Brent,

The Australian templates have carried those wall types for a long time. Nothing much changes in the Aussie template. Nor the Revit OOTB Aussie amilies. We just make up our own, as needed. Like for instance changing the 250 brick veneer to 240 brick veneer to match nominal aussie conditions. Gives you practice in making families and wall types. 🙂 Companies will have in some regards stricter content control and templates in revit than autocad, because of the parametric and reportable parameters associated with families and the liabilities associated with these. Hope your studies are going well. It is great to see, shall I say 'mature age', embracing it. I did. Never looked back.

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Posted : 11/08/2017 8:18 am
Brent
Trusted Member

Hey Peter

Thanks for that Aussie Revit feedback. Makes sense to me, being aware of your own industry practice.

Regards studies: Yep, getting through it. Need more Revit practice outside of TAFE class time.

Adding my own keyboard shortcuts and adjusting Revit's defaults has increased my drafting speed – as I grow more confident (I've always disliked mousing around new software interfaces for hidden menu commands when a quick flick on the keys pops up the command or dialog box much easier and faster).

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Posted : 30/08/2017 10:38 am Ian liked
  
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